Tag Archives: author blog

Forthcoming Guest Blog & New Novella!

Hurro!

So, on 16th of February, I will be guest blogging over at Shannon A. Thompson’s blog, talking about writing relatable teenage characters. I’m mega excited. Coinsiding with that will be the release of my new novella, Never Grow Up, about how one summer changes the course of a girl’s life and rockets her into the oblivion of adulthood.

Never Grow Up - High Resolution

It’s a funny, upbeat coming of age story about Jude, a tomboy who never wants to grow up. She just wants to live. It’s a quirky little read, filled with letters and texts and lamenting teen rants with an optimistic little sister, a swiftly changing best friend, a despairing dad, a jet-setting older sister and a band called The Manic Flamingos.

This sweet tale is told in just over 21,000 words and will be available on Kindle very soon for about 99p.

As ALWAYS, I’ll be giving away copies via Twitter, here, or anywhere you can find me. If I don’t thrust it in your face, just ask and I’ll oblige.

Honestly, this was such a pleasure to write. It’s a straight-up story of a girl’s choices at 18, when she doesn’t really want to make any. It’s about how one summer can change your life. Given that Honest is a very dark story with an unreliable narrator, this was just so refreshing. I’m hoping to pepper by full novels with novellas, to ease the transition from story to story.

They’re all stand alones, after all, so it’s important to get it across to readers that each book is about a very complex, very different character. I never write the same girl twice and their stories are wildly different. Indeed, they’re from all different walks of life, and that’s what makes it such a pleasure for me. I feel like I’ve got friends all over the place and I’m the one who gets to tell their story.

I think that’s why writing is just the best fun in the world. I’d recommend it to anyone. There’s no better escape!

Best wishes and snippy snappies,

Ava

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My First Interview!

My first author interview! Eeep!

It’s terrifying how fast this has all come around. It was only during the summer just gone that I made the massive decision to self publish my books. To me, it was like the fate of my future on my shoulders. I know, melodramatic much? But still, there I was, thinking of all those brave and passionate peeps out there who ‘go it alone’ and wondering if I’d ever pluck up the courage to do it myself.

Well, on January 6th, I made that first step. Honest is out there, and it’s being read and reviewed. More humbling than that is the fact its first review got five stars! This was from somebody who literally just loves reading and reviewing books, and after just a couple interactions on twitter, she read my entire book in just a day or so. Next thing I know, she’s given me a 5 star review and offered me an interview spot on her blog.

To me, that’s just the coolest thing ever. It’s like fancy dress. I  get to put on my fancy-shmancy author clothes and answer questions like a grown-up!

So, thanks to Liisur, I’ve started making baby steps. The support of the book bloggers and the self-publishing community is the thing that really astonishes me. There’s no one-upmanship at all; just lots of people willing to help a brother out. So far, my experience has been really pleasant and I’m so grateful for those people who have contacted me to get a copy of Honest; especially those who started reading right away.

I’ve said it to them, and I’ll say it now: even a 1 star review would be worth everything to me. Even if you hated my work and thought it was a steaming pile of cow dung, I’d still be a happy camper. All I ever wanted was to write books and for people to read them. If you’ve read and considered my work enough to actually review it, then you’re a star.

Of course, I won’t be saying that when the pitchforks come out, but we’ll cross that bridge when we come to it, hahaha…eerrrrh…yeah.

Anyway, if you fancy getting to know me a little bit better, and wouldn’t mind hearing about my writing process and what inspired my first book, you can find it HERE on the lovely Liisur’s blog!

In the interview, I talk a little bit about my other books too, starting with All Girls Cry. That’s coming your way soon, folks, though I don’t want to make any promises time-wise. Soon means soon. Suffice it to say, I made the right choice about the order in which to release them, or so I think. All Girls Cry is about as popular as Honest has been on Goodreads, so I’m sure it’s one of the most sought-after from my little collection.

Of course, the fact that Leap and Beyond haven’t had proper covers this whole time hasn’t helped to get them much exposure. Leap does have a gorgeous cover now, but Beyond is taking a little more time to find the right one. That’s no matter, though, because Beyond is also still being proofread by the lovely Dayna at Secret Lives of Fiction Lovers, so in a funny ol’ way, it’s all worked out!

Beyond is really special, though, so it’s worth the wait. It’s my most “romantic” (OooOOO) book and I’ve described it in my interview with Liisur as ‘a bitter-sweet tale of letting go’, so that gives you an idea.

So there we have it. Things be a’brewin’, folks!  I’ll be hopefully doing a couple of guest blogs in the very near future too, so look out for those. Or don’t. I could very well bore you to tears. In which case, as you were!

Cover Reveal: LEAP!

Wahooo!

Did you have a good Christmas and New Year? We at the Bloomfield household did!

In fact my year has started off rather well. Not only did my invoice for my last month of 2014 look *fantastic* considering I had a whole 2 weeks off, plus time off for Christmassy-related stuff, but I also just ordered a new cover this weekend and it’s ALREADY HERE.

Yes! That’s right! Those ugly MS-Paint place-holder covers are almost totally gone. I wish I’d never bothered with them in the first place but I couldn’t resist. I  was too excited to get the books up on Goodreads.

So once again I found myself shopping at Goonwrite.com, by far the best value for money I’ve ever come across for covers, and amazing quality too. I ordered my cover on Friday night – paid for two, in fact, because you get a discount and the dude is happy to keep a “credit” on file for you so that you can browse his new range of covers as and when they come in – and found it in my inbox this morning.

Is that amazing service or is that amazing? Hot-dawg.

I don’t know why I’m talking like that. I’m British. Must be all that sparkly customer servicey stuff I’ve been blathering on about. 😉

Without further waffling, here’s the sexy cover for LEAP!

Leap - High Resolution

Leap was such a tough one to find a cover for. I wanted it to have a retro-feel without being too camp, and most of all it needed to feel like a modern novel about the past, as opposed to a novel stuck in the past. Kat is definitely a modern 17 year old, despite its settings in 1997 and 1979, and the cover needed to reflect that.

There’s also the love-story elements and the concept of a girl being caught between two places; both in terms of time-period and in her personal life. She’s at a crossroads physically, emotionally, mentally – the whole shabang. Remember being 17? Yeah, that!

So it took a LOT of thinking outside the box to try and figure out how to pull all those elements together. It took me forever to actually stumble upon this cover, which I think is just perfect. It’s moody, it’s reflective, it’s contemporary, and it’s even complete with retro-looking clothes – almost fancy-dress style, which is perfect – and the model looks really rock ‘n’ roll. I particularly love her hair-do; it gives the impression of belonging to two styles and two eras, right? Get it?!

Another thing I loved about the model is she’s such an individual. Kat definitely prides herself on being a smart cookie who lives her life a little on the edge. She’s an A-grade student from a council flat in Peckham, who befriends a pair of punks from 1979 and sits in the loos with them smoking and drinking tins of Party Four. *Believe* me when I tell you how tough that was to personify visually.

You’re beginning to understand why I chose a stupid picture of a record player for the place-holder cover, right? Riiiight.

So there we have it. I hope you love the cover as much as I do, and here’s hoping it inspires more readers to click the ol’ “to read” button on Goodreads! That is, when I add it, of course. Gosh. I wasn’t born for administrative jobs, I can tell you that for nothing, duckies.

Ciao,

Ava

Double Cover Reveal!

W00p!

So it’s about time I got a shift-on with my books, and the place to start in terms of marketing, what with the books themselves being written and semi-edited – some written years ago, in fact – is with the covers.

Now, I have gone on quite a journey in terms of covers.

For a while I convinced myself that, seeing as my grand plan was to just get the book out there and get some reviews, I didn’t want to “over do it” by dressing them up as…you know, books.

Stupid, isn’t it?

I actually now realise that was my lack of self-confidence talking. Somewhere inside me was that evil voice saying, ‘What’s the point in dressing it up? It’s still crap. You can’t polish a turd, love.’

We’ve all got the Evil Voice inside us. Some are better at ignoring it than others, and I’m afraid I’ve always been particularly weak to it, even though I do truly believe in my work. It’s probably why it’s taken me so long to consider self-publishing to be an option for my hard-to-place works. Before, it just seemed like failure. I now see that a book being difficult to sell doesn’t make it bad.

Anyway, so there I was, convinced I had no right to pretty-up my work and spend money on it, so for some ridiculous reason, that converted to making some “simple” covers. Long story short, that was not working out. I’d made many attempts at making my own covers in Gimp,and they just looked like cut-and-paste collages, so I abandoned anything complicated. But even when I copied some “minimalist” covers that I loved, the best I could produce was some MS paint lookalikes that didn’t transfer well to the story at all. At all.

Problem was, I knew I needed good covers. I just had no budget at all, and the only “affordable” cover artists I’d found were, let’s say, uh…a bit shit. I wouldn’t ever name names – I can’t remember them anyway, because they were just Google results – and I know everybody has to start somewhere, but most of the pre-mades and even custom covers were overpriced for what wasn’t a very professional job. In fact most of them were down-right shoddy. Perhaps I wasn’t searching in the right places; perhaps I didn’t ask the right people. How these awful examples transferred to making my own awful covers, I’ll never know. Remember: Evil Voice.

So I was pretty down in the dumps about it all, until I stumbled upon Humble Nations. I was in love with the quality and style exhibited throughout this guy’s portfolio, and though he doesn’t appear to specifically make products for YA books, he does absolutely everything in between. His designs are such that you can think outside the box. There’s no “YA” tab, sure, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t great YA covers. The pre-made designs – of which there are hundreds – are very much symbolic, in that they aren’t all completely “literal” covers, although for some genres that require that, there are covers to suit.

He was my wish-list cover artist before I realised he did pre-mades, and after that, I was stoked. Seriously, go check out the prices on pre-mades. Amazing, right? Considering what the shoddy people charge, you can get a pro on a budget. If, however, you do have a budget for custom covers, it’s still the best place to go, in my opinion. Judging by the details on his website, the custom process is quite intimate between him and the author, so you work together to build the perfect cover, with concepts and several mock-ups to choose from.

Well, it was the best place for me, anyway, and each to their own.

So, after adding my crappy “minimalist” covers to Goodreads, I waited. Turns out not a lot of people like to add books with crappy covers to their “to-read” lists, and in truth, I wouldn’t add mine with covers like that either. A friend of mine said it’s vital because, even if they’re “okay” covers and not necessarily bad, it just doesn’t ignite much faith into the author and their book if there’s no effort in the window dressing. She was so right. I’d convinced myself that it was okay to skip probably the most important aspect purely because I was afraid of making that step. Oh, and the budget, of course. Mustn’t forget that.

When people did start adding my books, however, I picked the two most popular – which, unsurprisingly, was the darker, grittier two books of the four I’ve listed; Honest and All Girls Cry – and chose them to get covers first. When I find covers that match my other two books on my perusing, then I’ll go ahead and update those. There’s no rush, though. They won’t be available for a while, but I’m working on it.

I’m actually toying with the idea of getting Honest ready to come out around Halloween, what with it being a dark story, but we’ll see.

Anyway, I am just so stoked about the covers. I love them. For the first time, I actually managed to find covers that I felt expressed not just the story but the tones  of the stories; the atmosphere. That was really, really important to me. I didn’t want them to look like typical YA novels and I’m certain they look every bit as awesome and unique and above all, professional, as I’d hoped they’d be.

So without further ado – here they are! 😀

All Girl Crys - High ResolutionHonest - High Resolution

For me, I loved how the artist could take seemingly non-cover-pictures and make them work with the right font and the right style of genre/title in the pre-mades. For example, there’s a cover of a cheesy-looking guy with glowing white teeth and folded arms. You’d think that’d make a silly romance cover, or something – but the artist made it work by giving it the title “The Smug Shit”. Now it looks like a hilarious, anecdotal memoir or maybe a quirky business management book, or something like that. He just seems to have this insight into what photographs actually should convey, rather than what you’d initially expect them to convey.

The point is, for me, this graphic artist – and any great cover artist, I’d imagine – just communicated to me. I think that’s what I’d been missing before; that aspect of an artist’s work speaking to me. I guess to enjoy your own work, you need to be open to persuasion and allow yourself to be “spoken” to, or to receive that “Calling” to a particular graphic designer.

Oh, and it’s also important to remember that the Evil Voice is an idiot, and unhelpful, and that they can just go shove a sock in it.

My decision to self-publish

This is a hard blog post to write.

Years ago, when I was about 17, I decided that I was going to follow my original dream of becoming an author – or at least a part-time author while I pursued the ever-elusive “career”. There weren’t many “careers” for girls like me, who hate long office hours, databases, spreadsheets and, worst of all, people. I didn’t want to play bullshit-bingo all my life with someone who took their middle-management job far too seriously.

And it wasn’t until about March of this year that I discovered I didn’t have to. It took months to build up trust with the company and get my invoices up to graduate wages, but all that hard work was worth it. So the career thing looks like it won’t be so bad after all.

The writing was always going to be a problem. I desperately wanted to  be traditionally published. My first published story – and a few after – was some wannabe-horror tripe that was picked up by a small press who have since gone right out of business. Later, I wrote “romance” (eerr…actually begins with an E) under a pen-name and sold my first story for £50. A while later, I sold another to Harper Collins for £75.

By that point, though, I’d spent three years getting my degree (an arts degree, of course) which I achieved highly in, but I still hadn’t got that publishing deal.

“Why not ME?” I thought. “There are women my age selling books. What’s up with that?”

Unfortunately, it took a long time to realise that the recession had put a LOT of companies in the red. Or is it in the black? Red? Black? Oh, I don’t know. I told you I was crap with spreadsheety stuff. They were firmly up shit creek, anyway, so the good old days of Stephen King getting hundreds of dollars for short stories, and the days when publishers built-up writers over the course of years, finally pooffed out all together. Today, you have to be an instant best-seller, and if you’re not, you’ll never get another book deal unless you’re very, very lucky.

To discover this was devastating. It took a lot of wishful thinking and a ton of rejections to realise that none of this was my fault. My novels are fine. They aren’t crap. The quality of a concept or the writing itself matters less and less in today’s world, and unless you’re already famous, you need to have SOMETHING to pull out the hat to make yourself a desirable writer for publishers.

I don’t know what some of these people do; I really don’t. I don’t know what gets them the golden ticket. But I do know that their rights are restricted more than they were in the good old days, the advances small if not non-existent, and that feeling of a freshly printed novel in their hands wiped away by “ebook-first”. Sales, too, aren’t always guaranteed. Many massive publishing companies – appearing successful – have been bought out.

So even for those brilliant Charlie Buckets, the golden ticket wasn’t a promise. It was just a chance, and if you don’t make it, then your golden ticket won’t even get you a Snickers at the vending machine.

Self-publishing, for a long time, was considered vanity-press – the last attempts of the failures and the terrible writers and the arrogant sods who think everyone should understand their genius. Some people today still think that, because even when ebooks became big, it took  a long time for authors to see it as a viable option.

But then they did. We saw people like Jackie Collins deciding to self-publish. We saw people making  great, steady sales of their work. We saw people become millionaires. We saw people getting picked up by great publishing houses for good deals like the old days.

We’re still seeing that. Even weirder, people are reading self-published work. They aren’t just assuming that the stories must be terrible. Why? Because things have changed.

I used to think very, very negatively about self-publishing. I vowed never to let myself make that “last attempt of the failure”, and I was always terrified that one day, I would. Except I’m not terrified any more.

If the only benefit of getting a publishing deal, today – assuming you’re publishing Joe Bloggs’ debut – is a thorough editing, a pretty cover and…that’s it, then what do self-publishers have to lose?

“You lose first publishing rights. It becomes a re-print that no agent or publisher will touch,’ says the Literary Agent.

Well, they would say that. Self-publishers cut out the middle man. But the fact remains that self-published authors who make great sales are probably around the same ratio as traditionally-published people who make great sales. JUST  because you get a “book deal” doesn’t mean you’re going to sell well.

And as we’ve seen with both smaller presses and the big 5, that BIG BREAK won’t stop them from kicking you to the curb when their funds run out, or your book sells poorly. Some of those authors will get better deals; some will use the platform to further themselves. Many will go traditional AND self-publish. Most will just go back to being “un-published”.

Un-published, after all that?
Back in the day, authors always sold badly. They were unknown. It took time to build them up. Today, it appears, there is no time. It’s make or break, as they say.

So it’s taken a lot of thought, and a lot of observation, to realise that nothing is crystal clear any more, and as much as people insist that you must “choose your path”, there still is no straight path. It doesn’t exist. However much the “experts” protests, we, the writers, are in the driving seat. We are allowed to go exploring. Why wait at the bus stop for a bus that went out of service yonks ago?

Many, many traditionally published authors are weighing up their options today. Many of them like to do both the traditional thing and the self-publishing thing. Why shouldn’t they? It’s their work. Writers needn’t be so f-ing grateful all the time. We’re not slaves.

What’s interesting, too, is that the writing industry is the only creative industry where it’s still frowned upon to go it alone. How much sense does that make?! Do musicians wait for the big break with their guitars locked in their bedrooms, or do they get out there, do some gigs, hand out flyers, and publish their own tapes?

What about artists? Do they only give their art to family and friends, or do they get on Facebook and Deviantart, hand out flyers, and show the world their art? Do they hide away or do they start selling? In fact, I think artists accepted indie writers way before most writers did. Self-publishing is a platform for artists too. “Indie” is no longer a dirty word for writers.

How else would anybody see what you can do?

Writers have always had to let their novels die on their hard drives, because if the BIG DEAL doesn’t come, then they’re worse than pond scum. Well, I think we all know that things are different now. Self-publishing is a viable option.

I think it was Amanda Hocking that changed my mind. NOT her sales – I’m aware that was a phenomenon, and I think she is too. But she did say something about the guy from Blink182 – she posted a video of it – and how their band started out. His advice was to never wait for the magic hand to come down, pluck you out, and make it all happen for you.

You have to show people what you can do. A handful of agents glancing over your cover letter just won’t cut it.

So that’s what I’m going to do. I’ve thought over it long and hard, and I am no longer going to do the self-pitying thing. I won’t do it. I won’t spend my life pining over the magic hand.

That doesn’t mean I don’t still like traditional publishing. That doesn’t mean I don’t want an agent. I’m still waiting for my turn. But that turn will never come unless I get my work out there. At the end of the day, I’d rather people were reading my work – even if only a couple ever pick up my books – than let them die on the hard drive.

The negative-thinking-pitfall is not one I’ll go tumbling into again. It’s unproductive and it only damages me. Do I deserve to be damaged? No.

Getting my work out there will at least showcase what I can do. Maybe it’ll get me that agent on day, or that traditional deal. I sincerely hope so. I’m just not pining any more. I am awarding myself some respect. If people can do start-up magazines and artists can showcase their art, and musicians can busk and sell their CDs and do their gigs, then writers can show off their books. Simple as.

I am an artist like any other, and I’m going to make my  little corner of the world shine.

So, folks – watch this space. I have one ebook just about ready to go, and the other three to follow. My plan is to get them all up at once, because multiple books, I believe – from my research – makes people take a second glance.

I’ll be documenting my journey here and explaining my various reasons for doing this, or that, or the other.

I’ll be doing it my way after all. Yippee!

‘Beyond’ in editorial & the perks of being self-employed

Howdy-ho, folks.

You know, there’s something to be said for  being a teenager. Remember when it was acceptable to sleep until midday with one hoof out the covers? As an adult, I became aware of the fact that it wasn’t “acceptable” to be lazy any more. Well, it was whilst I was a student, of course, but by the time you enter the world of work, it becomes less a sign of being a care-free, albeit slobbish teenager, and more of being a lazy disgrace.

So, despite an illness I have which slows my metabolism to rock-bottom and used to make me sleep for England through sheer exhaustion, I try to make sure I’m up and at ’em at a reasonable time in the morning. The perks of being self-employed, however, make this “acceptable” waking time somewhere between 8 a.m. and 9 a.m. – not the ghastly 6 a.m.-7 a.m. of everyone else. I have no train to catch, no suit or uniform to wiggle into – I need only wake up, eat something, and waddle over to my couch with my laptop.

It is a beautiful way of working. EVERYONE should get to work like this. It saves money for the company and, believe it or not, I’m actually way more productive than I would be in a boring office.

My best friend, however, pointed out that she’s not good with distractions, and being around her TV, her books, her games, the shops – you name it, she’d stray to it. I argued she wouldn’t if she had deadlines, like me, but she insisted that she’d only take longer to do the job and therefore do a *poor* job of it. So I can see where she’s coming from, totally.

Now, why am I bringing up this particular topic? Well, it’s not to boast, although it could be seen that way. I bring it up because last night, I couldn’t switch my brain off at all. I laid awake for hours thinking of babies, of houses, of weddings, of money, of all *seemingly* nice and wholesome stuff. Except if that stuff requires money  – and it does, in shed-loads – then it actually becomes a point of anxiety, not excitement. I simply couldn’t stop thinking about the mundanities and expense of the future.

So when I awoke this morning feeling totally refreshed, you can imagine my surprise. Well, that soon left me when I saw the clock. It was 11.58 a.m.

I had, in fact, slept like a teenager. It was beautiful.

Turns out I’d mumbled something about not getting to sleep to my boyfriend, who was just leaving for work, and he must have switched the alarm off. Utter, utter bliss.

There were no knocks on the door, no phone-calls – not even any work in my inbox. I was left to sleep, and I hadn’t slept that long since I was a student. You know what? Screw adulthood. Sleep is good for everyone. Work to live, don’t live to work, as they say.

Mm-mmm.

___________________________________________

So in other news, my new novel, “Beyond”, has gone through two sets of edits with me, and another with my partner – an editor by profession, as luck would have it. So now that it’s taken a roughly good shape, I’ve passed it on to the awesome Dayna of Secret Lives of Fiction Lovers. She’s offered her services for free, ladies and gents, despite the fact that she has qualifications in proofreading and a backlog of edited novels under her belt.

She has been paid in the past, even though she was only seeking to expand her CV at this point, so I’m naturally incredibly grateful that she has offered to do this totally free of charge. I hope I help some way towards Dayna reaching her goal of working in the industry – oh, and I hope my novel isn’t so terrible that she gets bored and wants to sling it out the window ASAP. I have *assured* her that she isn’t obliged to continue working on it if it makes her wince. Aren’t I nice?

I will be looking for BETA READERS, so watch this space or message me on twitter. I’ll be giving books away like hot cakes – whether they’ll taste like hot cakes or steaming piles of dung, however, remains to be seen.

Leave a comment? I love comments.

Toodles!

Book Haul

Just a quick post today to show off my new book haul!

 

I was wandering around town in the sweltering heat, when I stumbled upon a shop selling books with some really great offers. I actually go there a lot and have bought some pretty great books from there, and quite cheaply, too.

Anyway, after perusing a little while. I spotted Under The Never Sky by Veronica Rossi, and was instantly enamoured with the cover art. It’s truly beautiful. Another reason this book struck me is because I avidly watch Lindsay Mead’s book reviews on Youtube, and she mentioned this quite some time ago in one of her book hauls.

I like Lindsay’ channel because she chooses genres that I wouldn’t usually go for, and she always has a great range of tastes. She also reviews self-published works, too, so I think that gives the audience a great all-rounder view of what’s out there. Go give her a follow! 🙂 I’ve also subscribed to a few other book-bloggy channels through her, as well. They’re based in the USA, so it’s cool to see what’s popular over there.

So once I decided to go ahead and pick up that book, I discovered that not only did they have the sequel, but they had the whole TRILOGY! I got ALL THREE BOOKS for £5!

I know! Am I jammy, or what?

So naturally I stuffed them all in my arms, admiring all the gorgeous matching covers, and bought them.

neversky

 

I started reading the first book last night in bed. It was pretty late and I’d been working hard all day doing my transcribing, so the fact that I managed to get through the first three chapters with droopy eyes is a miracle. I suppose it shows that the story was intriguing enough to keep me awake. 😉

So far, the writing is pretty choppy, but I like that. It’s action-packed.

The dystopian setting with all the different sectors and the artificial fruit, etc, reminds me a whole lot of Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood, which is an astonishingly great novel, by the way, and probably my favourite dystopia ever. I’ve only just met Pereguine, too, but the character looks a lot like a tribe member in Oryx and Crake. They’re called “Crakers”, and they’re basically a test-tube grown species who are allowed to live in their own little Eden. They were created by a young genius called Crake and socialised by Oryx, who are lovers in the novel. It’s an amazing story told from the point of view of a guy called Snowman who, in the fallout after an apocalypse, basically recounts how jealousy destroyed the universe.

I know. Amazing. There are spliced creatures called “Pigoons” and “Rakunks” running wild, too, so you NEED to read that. If you love the Fallout games, like I do, then you’ll love reading Oryx and Crake.

So yeah, there’s many clues so far that hint to me that perhaps Veronica Rossi was quite heavily inspired by Margaret Atwood. I’ve no idea if she actually was.

That’s my book haul and my current reading. I’ve also managed to plug a Youtuber and one of my favourite novels to boot. Not bad for one blog post!

I’m hoping to soon give you an update about my current WIP, which I picked up after a long break. It currently sits at about 50k, and it’s coming along nicely. I prefer novels to be in the 70k/80k range, but I usually let them run and see where it takes me. As a rule, my novels have never gone much over 90k.

The working title is “Prom Spirit”, but I’m warming to the title being “Beyond” once it’s done. I think that’s a beautiful title, and fitting, too.

———————————————————

I am hoping to build up a network of writers/bloggers to give me emotional/practical support during the writng process. I’ve been going this alone (barring my lovely, very helpful fiance!) for a long time, and seeing as I’ve decided to re-brand myself with a pen name, I think it’s only fitting I start reaching out a bit more.

So, if you’re a writer/blogger, please subscribe to me and I will subscribe right back.
Than we can be pals. 🙂

By way of introduction…

Hello! Guten Tag! Aloha! Bonjour! Etc

 

Readers, nosers, boggers and ear-wiggers – welcome to my new blog, and thanks for popping by. Feel free to have a little snoop about! Here I  plan on blogging about my various bookish-related news; perhaps what I’m currently reading and, just maybe, what I’m currently writing.

You can find my completed novels – which are eagerly, desperately and most DEFINITELY searching for a home – in the “books” tab above.

Please note that whilst Ava Bloomfield’s novels remain so far unpublished and unrepresented – a crying shame! – Ava has had various works published under either her boring real-world name or another pseudonym. Mostly, these publications are short stories, either as stand-alone pieces or in anthologies for pro-paying venues, such as Harper Collins, for instance. Ava has also been published via online magazines, including articles and reviews, and likes to keep abreast of the goings-on in the publishing world. Mostly this includes conspiring with other hopefuls on Absolute Write, or simply Facebooking with other writers in the industry.

So you see, there’s a lot behind a name, and Ava is just another version of me; a dedicated spokesperson for my love of Young Adult.

 

If you think you’d be interested in representing me, or you would like to know more about my work, please contact me here: AvaBloomfield (at) Outlook (dot) Com.

 

See you laterz, mashed pertaterz.

 

Ava